Towns of two halves

Radegast brewery

Radegast brewery

So, another weekend and another mess of absurdity would await us. This time two of us had come up with the impulsive idea of a trip to the very borders of the Czech Republic and Poland, to a town which straddles the river Olza and both countries. The reasoning behind this was not all that clear, but it was confidently decided after several beers that it was definitely the right thing to do – besides one us had a bag full of Polish zlotys burning a whole in his shorts. The idea would be then to wind our way back to Blansko the next day for home game against Tatran Bohunice (plus referee).

A trip like this could throw up myriad possibilities so we got to work on a general itinerary and two days later, after a long night of heavy drinking, I woke up on Ralph’s sofa at about 6 in the morning feeling a little better than I should. Off we shot to catch a bus and finally, my hangover. Our first stop was a bus interchange in Frýdek-Místek to the small village of Nošovice. We alighted to the sight of exotic animals such as camels and zebras. Yes the local circus had arrived, and I’m not talking about the Klobása. We walked over to the train station pub to find only two guys in there, both passed out on different tables, bald heads shining in the dim lights. We sank one down in near silence, took a couple of photos and headed on to Nošovice, home to the Radegast brewery. Now Radegast ain’t a bad pint, and it’s also the beer of choice at one of our favourite pubs back in Brno, U průmyslovky, but here at the brewery they weren’t serving. And some kids were buying cans of some fruit-flavoured Birrell or something. Disappointing. We headed to one Radegast pub to find it closed, but this being the Czech Republic there was another bar close by – but this had a different beer from yet another brewery! Kohutka serves up a lovely unfiltered 11 degree.

Radegast and sleeping man

Radegast and sleeping man

Out next stop would be to have a quick look around the twin town of Frýdek-Místek. Frýdek-Místek is really quite an attractive place, with a picturesque square typical of many Czech towns. We took a seat outside a bar and had another pint of Radegast before heading on to the football ground to watch Frýdek-Místek lineup against Ceske Budejovice. It’s a good ground at Frýdek-Místek, with a rousing atmosphere. We sat with the ultras for awhile and sang some songs about trees (or at least that is what the steward told us) before we headed to try the ham klobása . Let’s just say, it weren’t the best. It wasn’t as low as the Polna klobása, maybe, but really it has added to the list of recent disappointments (oh how I miss you Bystrc). One thing that will keep it out of the relegation zone of the klobasa league table however was the simple addition of kren! Yes, finally there is some goddamn horseradish! The game ended 2-0 and we wondered back in to town and on to our final leg of our journey to our second twin-town of the trip Český Těšín. 

Frýdek-Místek square

Frýdek-Místek square

Frýdek-Místek klobasa

Frýdek-Místek klobasa

Hopping off the train we grabbed a quick coffee in the Hotel across the round from the station (Can not remember the name, but anybody who has ever been there has stayed in it) with it’s mad, wonderfully dated, interior. The pick me up was welcome and the coffee carried us to the river, to enjoy the novel experience of walking unhindered in to another country. We stood on the opposing side of the river and stared back at the Czech Republic, before walking through the town to our hotel. After a quick break we headed to a pub in the town’s main square. The Polish side of this town is really an attractive place to sit and have a beer. We sat outside a bar and watched the evening revelers wonder back and forth looking for an appropriate drinking hole. We finally finished up our beer and did the same, only to find the micro-brewery we were after was closed, seemingly indefinitely! We trawled past discos and bars but nothing seemed right. Eventually, tiring of this expedition, we simply did what we do best – we went back to Czech and found a pajzl (think, a pub with “atmosphere”). We walked in to middle-aged couples dancing to Czech classic songs and people enhancing their minds through their nose in the toilets. Here we sat happily entertained by the massive guy next to us looking for a bit of “how’s your father” with his lucky senorita. We passed the time judging how much of an impression he was making – it was a big one whichever way it was going. After sinking a few beers and the biggest shot of pear brandy I’ve ever seen in my life we stumbled out of the pub and into the recollection that this is the area where all that poisoned booze that was killing everyone came from. Well, we’d have to wait for the morning to find out. The question was, would we make it to Blansko alive the next day… ?

Pajzl with Radegast and pear brandy

Pajzl with Radegast and pear brandy

 

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